Common Core -- Curriculum Aims to Standardize What U.S. Students Learn

By Roberts, Jane | The Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN), March 8, 2012 | Go to article overview

Common Core -- Curriculum Aims to Standardize What U.S. Students Learn


Roberts, Jane, The Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN)


Michele Dial has taught school for 23 years. But last month, for the first time in her career, she spent an entire hour teaching first-graders at Lakeland Elementary to add and subtract by tens.

"This is a great big, huge skill, and we have never done it before," Dial told the children. "I want you to remember the commutative and inverse properties," she said as students pondered 92 - 10 = 82 and 82 + 10 = 92.

"OK, let's put it in a sentence," Dial continued, writing on the board while the children followed along.

"Great. Kiss your brain," Dial said as hands across the room arced triumphantly between puckered lips and foreheads.

The lesson and time spent teaching "deeply," as Dial describes it, are among the most tangible signs of Tennessee's progress in adopting Common Core Standards.

The effort is led by the National Governors Association and other groups intent on standardizing nationwide what children learn and when .

In 2009, 48 states and the District of Columbia committed to raise academic standards; 45 states and Washington have adopted the Common Core Standards.

(Nebraska, Virginia, Texas and Alaska have not adopted them. Minnesota has partially adopted them.)

Tennessee budgeted $2.95 million in federal money to make the change. About half - $1.6 million - is set aside to train teachers.

"The really cool thing, if Common Core is implemented well, is there is a lot more critical thinking and rigor," said David Mansouri, spokesman for the State Collaborative on Reforming Education.

"It's a piece of reform work, but really a critical piece. If you have higher standards, kids will achieve more."

It requires states to throw out content no longer important to be ready for college or work to focus on lessons that are.

In third grade, for instance, Tennessee teachers will go from teaching 113 standards to 26 under Common Core.

"At one point, Tennessee had more standards than any state except Texas," said David Stephens, head of curriculum and instruction in Shelby County Schools. "We were teaching a mile wide and inch deep."

This year, K-2 students in Tennessee are learning the new standards in math. Next year, the new standards will be taught in grades 3-8.

By 2013-2014, all students will be taught under the new standards. And then in 2015, national exams will be in place, making it possible for the first time to compare student achievement across states.

Based on ACT scores, about 4 percent of Memphis City Schools students and 20 percent of Shelby County Schools students are ready to succeed in college. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Common Core -- Curriculum Aims to Standardize What U.S. Students Learn
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.