Eugene ONeills Light-Hearted Remembrances of Things Past

By Mackay, Barbara | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, March 21, 2012 | Go to article overview

Eugene ONeills Light-Hearted Remembrances of Things Past


Mackay, Barbara, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


In 1932, Eugene ONeill, who was already famous for his serious, searing dramas, wrote a light-hearted play, Ah, Wilderness! that is currently being given an impeccable production at Arena Stage.

The story of a tightly knit family on a typical Fourth of July in 1906 at their Connecticut home, Ah, Wilderness begins in nineteenth- century melodramatic mode, with all the older members of the Miller family condemning the seventeen-year-old son, Richard (William Patrick Riley) for his interest in new, radical writers like Oscar Wilde, Henrik Ibsen and George Bernard Shaw.

Richards father, Nat Miller (Rick Foucheux) is a well-educated newspaper publisher. It takes until the end of the play for him to admit that he sees the humor in Shaw. Richards mother, Essie (Nancy Robinette) is a fussy woman who at the beginning of the play treats Richard as though he is 12. Although Richard has three other siblings (played by Davis Hasty, Talisa Friedman, and Thomas Langston/T.J. Langston), the play is really Richards coming-of-age story.

Nats sister, Lily (Kimberly Schraf) lives with the family. For years she has spurned the advances of Essies brother, Sid (Jonathan Fried) because he drinks and gambles. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Eugene ONeills Light-Hearted Remembrances of Things Past
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.