'BEST KEPT SECRET': ; HSTA Promotes Science, Higher Education

By Harris, Amy Julia | The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV), March 24, 2012 | Go to article overview

'BEST KEPT SECRET': ; HSTA Promotes Science, Higher Education


Harris, Amy Julia, The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV)


As the final bell of the day blared through the halls of Riverside High School, hundreds of backpack-toting students bee- lined for the parking lot and an afternoon of freedom.

But sophomores Ginny Milsap and Michael Gilmore headed to the upstairs science lab, donned safety goggles, and began burning peanuts.

"We're trying to see whether cashews or pecans have more power," said Gilmore, lighting a pecan affixed to a paperclip on fire. Milsap adjusted a charred soda can filled with water that dangled above the nut and got her thermometer ready.

"The more the temperature of the water changes, the more energy there is in the nut," said Milsap. "So we measure the temperature before and after and see which has the biggest change."

Gilmore and Milsap are just two of the more than 800 students across the state gearing up for the final phase of their annual science projects as part of a special college-going program called Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA).

Education officials say HSTA is one of the best-kept secrets in West Virginia education and think they've hit on a home-grown solution to help clamp down on major problems in the state: a low college-going rate and a lack of professionals with science and health backgrounds.

After hearing a constant drumbeat about a shortage of scientists and health-care professionals in Appalachia, Ann Chester founded the Health Sciences and Technology Academy in 1994 to try to tackle a piece of the problem.

She created HSTA - a health, science, technology, and math program based out of West Virginia University that provides special programs for high school students from rural, minority, and first- generation college backgrounds.

Students in HSTA attend weekly meetings after school, complete and present an annual science project and attend intensive science and math summer camps each year. If students keep their grades up all four years in the program, they can receive tuition waivers to any public university in the state.

"It's a way to capture our potential youth to get them to work in the state at successful levels," Chester said. "And the community owns the program."

Since the program began 18 years ago with just a handful of students, it has expanded to 26 counties throughout the state and serves about 800 students. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

'BEST KEPT SECRET': ; HSTA Promotes Science, Higher Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.