Capitalism: There Is Only the Vilification

By Didier, Marcel | Telegraph - Herald (Dubuque), April 15, 2012 | Go to article overview

Capitalism: There Is Only the Vilification


Didier, Marcel, Telegraph - Herald (Dubuque)


Fans of Saul Alinsky, the theoretician of the Chicago School of left-wing ideology, are familiar with this radical slogan: "There is only the fight."

Hillary Clinton used it to write a loving tribute to Alinsky's "Rules For Radicals" in her 1969 Wellesley College degree thesis, and Obama enthusiastically taught these disturbing concepts to his band of community organizers.

And there you have the inspiration for the continuing demonization by the Left of its ideological opposition.

For various reasons, many politicians, college instructors and even corporate CEOs have been misrepresenting if not vilifying the basic tenets of the ideal of free-market capitalism, the only one of the theories on political economies that has ever produced wealth for its true adherents.

What better way to discredit a theory than to enact anti-free- market policies (bailouts, green loans, circumventing bankruptcy laws for favored companies ...) and then blame their failures on capitalism?

Free-market capitalism requires three fundamentals: freedom to own property, free and fair competition, and the rule of law. Unfortunately, the federal government since at least Franklin Roosevelt has been diminishing those very principles: eminent domain threatens property rights, competition is thwarted by government mandates, by redistributive interference and favoritism, and laws selectively applied and misapplied.

The general vilification of the powerful notion of competition is reflected in the recent "dueling" articles in this newspaper about competition in our two hospitals. The Finley Hospital, Dubuque, wants to compete better with Mercy Medical Center-Dubuque through its own catheterization lab, but Mercy's anti-competitive posture may keep this local monopoly going with the expert help of presumed socially-responsible bureaucrats sitting in Des Moines, nobly wishing not to "waste money on duplicative services."

Economics is obviously the most neglected and misunderstood subject in this "capitalist" nation. Occasionally, the light shines through and even students could figure out, for example, that to justify the purchase of President Obama's ideologically-favored car, i. …

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