Readers' Forum

The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV), April 18, 2012 | Go to article overview

Readers' Forum


Gazette turns its back on religious freedom

Editor:

I write in regard to the Gazette editorial defending the Obama health-care policy. This policy now forces Catholic hospitals and schools to provide contraceptive and abortion benefits in employees' health insurance plans.

With this decree, thus ends the American tradition of respect for the spiritual conscience of citizens. Government edicts now replace individual decisions concerning the most personal moral aspects of our lives.

Religious freedom dies when the state usurps the moral code of your freely chosen faith. A person may choose to use contraception pills or have an abortion, but that person should not force fellow citizens to pay for it.

Catholics should not have their religious rights violated because they reach out to help sick people with nonprofit loving care. Soon every church will be controlled by government mandates.

Sadly, our Charleston Gazette abandons the free-press tradition of vigilantly guarding the constitutional right of religious freedom. The remaining rights enumerated in the Bill of Rights will not long endure. Rule of the state, for the state, by the state will quickly follow.

Father Patrick McDonough

St. Albans

Where can glass be recycled near Sutton?

Editor:

I would like to know where one can recycle glass jars. I used to take my plastics to Sutton, which is six miles from my home. Now they quit taking recyclables, so I will have to take things to Gassaway, which is about twice as far. No one close takes glass.

Bonnie M. Westfall

Sutton

Ringling Bros. Circus abuses elephants

Editor:

Ringling Bros. was fined $270,000 by the USDA on Nov. 23 for noncompliance with the Animal Welfare Act - the largest such fine ever!

Ringling's "training" tools are a terrifying combination of ropes, chains, bull hooks, electric shock prods, maternal deprivation and corporal punishment. Animals only "perform" because of punishment or threat of more punishment. They remember the pain inflicted upon them.

During "training," baby elephants are bound by ropes and wrestled by several adult men into confusing and physically difficult positions, they scream, cry and struggle as they are stretched out, slammed to the ground, gorged with bull hooks and shocked with electric prods. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Readers' Forum
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.