These Walls: Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education, Tulsa

By Davis, KirLee | THE JOURNAL RECORD, April 26, 2012 | Go to article overview

These Walls: Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education, Tulsa


Davis, KirLee, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Although the experiment has barely begun, the Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education has already proven a successful University of Tulsa extension into downtown's expanding Brady District arts community.

That's an important point to university President Steadman Upham, who also has moved to establish a downtown medical school in cooperation with the University of Oklahoma's Tulsa campus. But that huge project still has two years of development before its first students enter those halls. The Zarrow Center hit the ground running last month.

"I was down there this morning just looking at the facility," Upham said in an interview last week. "It's beginning to come together as a real functioning facility."

The center has its roots in revitalization, not just of the 90- year-old Tulsa Paper Co. warehouse that's long stood vacant, but of a downtown blue-collar district that, in its 1920s heyday, played a bedrock role in Tulsa commerce.

The George Kaiser Family Foundation spearheaded the effort to revitalize that empty block, once home to four empty brick warehouses, as the centerpiece for a resurgent arts district. With the support of the foundation, TU, the Gilcrease Museum that is managed by TU, and the Philbrook Museum of Art, Manhattan Construction has spent the last year revitalizing three of the four warehouses.

This spring Manhattan finished the three-story, 18,000-square- foot Tulsa Paper Co. portion, which TU and Gilcrease operate. The Philbrook portion should open later this year.

The Zarrow Center's first floor will provide rotating art exhibit space for both instructional use and public entertainment.

"We've done this at Gilcrease in the past," Upham said of coordinating art and historical exhibits with public school educational programs. "We wanted to expand that."

The space also offers TU a platform for displaying artworks by its students, faculty and visiting artists, with a bar and other features for hosting gatherings.

"They'll be rotating exhibitions of art that really come out of the university environment," Upham said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

These Walls: Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education, Tulsa
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.