EARTH TALK ; 'Cloud Computing' Services Suck Up Energy

The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV), May 14, 2012 | Go to article overview

EARTH TALK ; 'Cloud Computing' Services Suck Up Energy


E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: Why is Greenpeace upset with some leading tech companies for so-called "dirty cloud computing?" Can you explain? - Jeremy Wilkins, Waco, Texas

Leading tech companies like Google, Apple and Microsoft are now offering unprecedented amounts of data storage and access to "apps" on huge Internet-connected servers, saving consumers and businesses the hassle of installing and running programs and storing information on their own local computers.

This emerging trend, dubbed cloud computing, means that these providers have had to scale up their power consumption considerably, as they are increasingly responsible for providing more and more of the computing horsepower required by the world's two billion Internet users.

No doubt, sharing such resources on centralized servers is more efficient than every individual and business running their own versions separately. In fact, the research firm Verdantix estimates that companies off-loading data and services to cloud servers could save $12 billion off their energy bills and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 85 million metric tons within the next decade.

But for the greenhouse gas savings to be realized, the companies offering cloud computing services need to make the right energy choices.

Greenpeace has been tracking sustainability among tech companies for over a decade, and recently released a report, "How Green is Your Cloud?" assessing the green footprint of the move to cloud computing.

According to the analysis, some of the major players (Google, Facebook and Yahoo) have gone to great lengths to ensure that significant amounts of the power they need come from clean, green sources like wind and solar.

But Greenpeace chastises others (Apple, Amazon and Microsoft) for relying on so-called "dirtier" sources of power, such as coal and nuclear, to run their huge data centers.

"When people around the world share their music or photos on the cloud, they want to know that the cloud is powered by clean, safe energy," says Gary Cook, a Senior Policy Analyst with Greenpeace. …

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