Reed Leads Campaign against Waste

By Zremski, Jerry | The Buffalo News (Buffalo, NY), June 18, 2012 | Go to article overview

Reed Leads Campaign against Waste


Zremski, Jerry, The Buffalo News (Buffalo, NY)


You and your fellow American taxpayers have spent $356,933 studying the impact that cocaine use has on the mating habits of quails.

You also paid $120 million to deceased federal workers in 2010.

And you came very close to shelling out $20 million for a Pakistani version of "Sesame Street."

Are you unhappy yet?

Rep. Tom Reed is.

And that's why he and his staff have taken to scouring the budget and other sources for such examples of, well, unexpected federal spending -- and, once a month, doing all he can to publicize them.

Noting that the $15.7 trillion national debt was one of the reasons he first ran for Congress in 2010, Reed said that it's only natural that he join with other lawmakers, such as Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., and Rep. Jim Gerlach, R-Pa., who are also on the lookout for what they see as wasteful federal spending.

"We at least need to ask the question every day about every dollar we spend," said Reed, a Corning Republican whose Southern Tier-based district will stretch into Chautauqua County next year. "And when we identify areas that are wasteful, fraudulent or abusive, or just not that level of a priority, we wanted to be part of a process to really spotlight it."

Federal officials defend some of the spending items Reed has highlighted since his effort began in February, and Democrats dismiss his effort as a publicity stunt.

But to budget hawks, Reed is becoming an heir to the legacy of the late Sen. William Proxmire, D-Wis., whose monthly "Golden Fleece Award" highlighted similar spending items -- and frequently made national news in the 1970s and 1980s.

"I think that anyone who gets this sort of information out there is helpful to the effort to eliminate wasteful spending," said Thomas A. Schatz, president of Citizens Against Government Waste, which regularly targets a lawmaker as the "Porker of the Month" for promoting wasteful spending.

Reed is doing just the opposite, "and certainly having a member of Congress take the time and effort to review the budget and highlight the most egregious spending items will continue to draw attention to the waste," Schatz said.

Coburn has been highlighting reports on government waste for years, and Reed said his office confers with the senator's office and Gerlach's office on such items.

"It's an informal thing we've been doing," Reed said. "There's no coordinated effort. We just kind of share the information and each decide individually which ones to release."

And since February, Reed's releases have been the most, well, colorful.

Whereas Coburn tends to take on such hardy perennials as unspent federal dollars and waste, fraud and abuse in Medicare and Medicaid, Reed seems to some to be on the lookout for shock value.

And that's what prompts some criticism of his efforts.

For example, in a news release last week about those coked-up quails, he said: "If someone wants to find out how cocaine impacts sexual behavior in quails and it is worthwhile, they should find a private source to fund it. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Reed Leads Campaign against Waste
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.