Oklahoma Sleep Institute to Manage Lynn Institute Lab

By Brus, Brian | THE JOURNAL RECORD, June 15, 2012 | Go to article overview

Oklahoma Sleep Institute to Manage Lynn Institute Lab


Brus, Brian, THE JOURNAL RECORD


The Oklahoma Sleep Institute will manage Lynn Institute's sleep laboratory and develop specialty clinics dedicated to sleep disorder diagnosis and treatment, officials recently announced.

"We're extremely excited about our new arrangement with OSI," said Karen Vinyard Waddell, chief executive of Oklahoma City-based Lynn Institute. "Their comprehensive sleep medicine delivery model will only enhance our strong legacy of integrity and innovation in sleep and help to expand our services to be more patient- and physician-friendly."

Sleep is beginning to be more widely accepted as the new vital sign of overall physical and emotional health, said William Orr, senior scientist at the Lynn Institute and founder of the Lynn sleep lab.

"Data is accumulating that shows a link between sleep and obesity, diabetes and numerous cardiovascular problems," he said. "Sleep problems are incredibly prevalent in our society. It's been estimated that 30-40 percent of the general population at some point in time will have a significant sleep problem."

And contrary to popular belief, it is not possible to trade one hour of sleep for one more hour of increased productivity. Research suggests that even small amounts of sleep deprivation can significantly affect a person's mood, health, memory and work ability.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's latest study reported that insufficient sleep can have potentially fatal consequences for fatigued workers and people around them - an estimated 20 percent of vehicle crashes are linked to drowsy driving, for example. Overall, 30 percent of employed U.S. adults, or about 40.6 million workers, reported an average sleep duration of six hours or less per day, compared with seven to nine hours recommended by the National Sleep Foundation. …

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