Movie Review: 'Art & Copy'

By Klein, Andy | The Christian Science Monitor, September 11, 2009 | Go to article overview

Movie Review: 'Art & Copy'


Klein, Andy, The Christian Science Monitor


Long before "Mad Men," the advertising profession occupied a special, not very desirable place in the American consciousness. "Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter?" (1957) and the sublime "Lover Come Back" (1962) raked the industry over the coals. For a later, hipper audience, "Putney Swope" (1969) and "How to Get Ahead in Advertising" (1989) did the same - but with New... Improved... Rakes! and Hotter... 50 percent Brighter... Coals! Films like "12 Angry Men" (1957) and "Joe" (1970) used this professional designation as a shorthand for capitalism at its slickest and shallowest. Even Cary Grant's Roger O. Thornhill (the "O" stands for "nothing," he quips) in "North by Northwest" is besmirched with the label: He may be a charmer, but he's also (at the start) as slick and shallow as the rest. So maybe it's time to look at the positive side of an industry that - Doug Pray tells us in his new documentary "Art & Copy" - is projected to be doing half a trillion dollars' worth of annual business by 2010. Pray barely gives us any pre- 1960s history, skipping from cave drawings in the first scene to the current day Wieden & Kennedy firm in the second. He's only concerned with the past 4-1/2 decades, during which, he proposes, a number of particularly talented figures from the creative side of the old agencies broke away and revolutionized the business. The film contains all or part of some of the most indelible concepts of the period, from the luggage tossed into a gorilla's cage and "I can't believe I ate the whole thing!" to "I _ New York" and Nike's "Just do it." (The last, it is revealed, was inspired by Gary Gilmore's exhortation "Let's do it!" to his executioners.) For those of a certain age, there is plenty of nostalgic pleasure: Apple's "1984" spot (directed by Ridley Scott) still impresses; the 1994 Aaron Burr "Got Milk?" ad remains funnier, second for second, than any comedy out of Hollywood in living memory, and more memorable on the whole than anything its director, Michael Bay ("Transformers," "Pearl Harbor"), has made since. …

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