What Recovery? Budget Deficits Get Worse for States

By Scherer, Ron | The Christian Science Monitor, December 18, 2009 | Go to article overview

What Recovery? Budget Deficits Get Worse for States


Scherer, Ron, The Christian Science Monitor


Budget deficits for 2010 have worsened in 39 states in the past two or three months, according to a new analysis by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

State budgets are sliding deeper into the red than many governors and legislators expected only a few months ago.

As a result, states including Washington and Minnesota will have to find ways to fill their widening deficits.

On Friday, a new analysis by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP), a Washington think tank, found that the 2010 budget situation has worsened in 39 states in the past two or three months. The new, additional gap: more than $34 billion.

"The shortfall is emerging as forecasts and data catch up to reality," says Nicholas Johnson, a co-author of the CBPP analysis. "Some states haven't done an official budget projection since last spring," says Mr. Johnson, who is director of the organization's state fiscal project.

This past spring, most states were still trying to recover from trying to fill their 2009 budget gaps. Many used rainy-day funds and one-time gimmicks, and they borrowed as much as their constitutions allowed. Some, such as Connecticut, North Carolina, and Hawaii, raised taxes on the highest-income residents.

The stimulus package passed by Congress in February helped states cover 30 to 40 percent of their shortfall. But revenues have continued to decline for most states.

For fiscal year 2010, CBPP estimates, 48 states are facing budget shortfalls that total $190 billion. (This figure includes the new gap of about $34 billion.)

The following year is not much brighter, with some 41 states anticipating deficits. Initial estimates for 2011 put the gap at $97 billion, but Johnson estimates that the shortfalls are likely to be closer to $180 billion. "By then, we will have seen the end of the federal aid," he says.

State revenues, like employment numbers, often lag behind any improvements in the national economy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

What Recovery? Budget Deficits Get Worse for States
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.