After the Bombings in Moscow

By Helm, Marie | The Christian Science Monitor, March 31, 2010 | Go to article overview

After the Bombings in Moscow


Helm, Marie, The Christian Science Monitor


A Christian Science perspective.

I spend almost half of every year in Russia and frequently visit Moscow, where I regularly travel on its subways. I have many friends in Moscow, and I love praying to support the ongoing efforts to improve daily life there and throughout Russia.

Monday morning I was shocked, and had to fight a sense of grief and horror, when I learned about the suicide bombings that took place in Moscow's subway system. But I knew that letting those emotions reign in my thoughts would do little to ameliorate the situation or help others overcome the same sense of grief and fear that seemed so palpable right then.

As single individuals, perhaps we can't solve the immediate political and cultural issues that give rise to such destructive acts of terrorism around the world. But we can do something vitally important - we can let compassion transform our own thoughts, desires, and actions. Like ripples in a pond, our thoughts are far- reaching. They touch the lives of others and bear witness to the power of divine Love in action in our world.

I saw a beautiful little example of the healing effect of compassion - our unbiased love and efforts to understand our fellow man - take place in August 2000. My husband and I were visiting friends in Moscow when a bomb exploded in a busy underground passageway in the center of the city, just as people were heading home from work.

The city was in a frenzy to help those in need, reestablish order, and find the perpetrators. The attack had been carried out by people from the Caucasus, and everywhere, those who looked as if they might be from that region were being stopped and their documents examined.

The next morning, we needed to take the train into the city center. Fear was on the faces of so many people. As my husband, my Russian friend, and I boarded the train, a man of Caucasus ethnicity boarded, too. Everyone began to move away from him - some people even left the car - and he sat alone, looking isolated and miserable.

I began to pray. I didn't want to accept the notion that our ethnicity, culture, or religion could define or limit our ability to express our God-given goodness. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

After the Bombings in Moscow
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.