The Publisher

By Weinberg, Steve | The Christian Science Monitor, April 2, 2010 | Go to article overview

The Publisher


Weinberg, Steve, The Christian Science Monitor


Alan Brinkley looks beyond the stereotypes to create a more nuanced portrait of magazine publisher Henry Luce.

So many books focused on the years 1900-2000 use the words

"American Century" in the title or subtitle that I have become

suspicious of them. It is an ethnocentric and sometimes downright

xenophobic phrase, suggesting the United States of America is,

appropriately or not, the center of the universe.

But a biography of magazine publisher Henry Luce (1898-1967) can

legitimately employ the cliched phrase. Why? Because Luce either

coined it or, at minimum, made it a familiar part of the English

language through the magazines he published - especially Time,

Fortune, Life, and Sports Illustrated.

As a biographer myself, I am also suspicious of biographies that

recount the lives of famous folks already chronicled multiple times.

Why, I wondered, would Columbia University history professor Alan

Brinkley spend years on a Luce biography when W.A. Swanberg and other

skilled professionals had already told the Luce saga?

Brinkley answers that question in his preface to The Publisher:

Henry Luce and His American Century, as he discloses that

Swanberg's interpretation of Luce, published during 1972, seemed

crabbed and therefore ultimately open to debate.

To Swanberg and other chroniclers of Luce's life, what seemed

important, according to Brinkley, "was his arrogance, his dogmatism

and his reactionary, highly opinionated politics - all of which

found reflection in his magazines." The stereotype of Luce held

that he had become a cold warrior who hated the Soviet version of

Communism and campaigned against the Communist takeover of China.

Luce blindly supported capitalism and the Republican Party, despite

their flaws, the stereotype continued.

All true to some extent, Brinkley posits, "but Luce was other

things as well." As a publisher, he and partner Briton Hadden

pretty much invented the weekly news magazine, giving birth to Time

in 1923 shortly after both men had graduated from Yale University.

Then Luce invented the modern business magazine with the debut of

Fortune, the modern photojournalism magazine with the debut of Life,

and the modern sports magazine with the debut of Sports Illustrated.

Furthermore, Luce demonstrated an open mind on numerous crucial

issues other than China, the Soviet Union, Communism, capitalism, and

Republican Party politics. In fact, Luce used his increasingly

influential magazines to promote civil rights, especially for

African-Americans.

The biography is pretty much relentlessly chronological, but that

standard structure does not suggest that it is boring. Brinkley is a

first-rate stylist, which helps sustain interest. Even better, he is

a first-rate researcher, digging into the Luce and Time Incorporated

archives to unearth fascinating details about Luce's unusual

childhood, unusual family situation, competitive years at Yale, and

remarkable success within the magazine world by age 25. Furthermore,

Brinkley demonstrates that the apparent curmudgeon had a lively love

life involving multiple extraordinary women, including his second

wife, Clare Boothe Luce, who achieved celebrity status as a writer,

actress, elected politician, and diplomat. …

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