Top Picks: Carole King and James Taylor, 'Disgrace,' 'Obsessive Consumption,' and More Recommendations

The Christian Science Monitor, May 12, 2010 | Go to article overview

Top Picks: Carole King and James Taylor, 'Disgrace,' 'Obsessive Consumption,' and More Recommendations


Carole King and James Taylor collaborate on new CD, postapartheid tale of 'Disgrace' now on DVD, an entertaining look at consumer culture in 'Obsessive Consumption,' and more top picks.

Drawing credit

Faced with mountains of postgraduation debt, artist Kate Bingaman- Burt started drawing every item from her credit-card statement as a form of penance until her bills were paid. That idea led to her drawing one of her purchases every day accompanied by witty commentary. "Obsessive Consumption: What Did You Buy Today?" (Princeton Architectural Press) pulls together a selection of those ink drawings from pens and pizza to fake fangs and a mattress as a tongue-in-cheek peek at consumer culture.

Man and whale

"Into the Deep: America, Whaling & the World" on PBS May 10 at 9 p.m. is at once an adventure story, a commercial narrative, and a cautionary tale about our relation to the natural world. Whaling elevated some of America's most unlikely ports into international destinations and fueled the worldwide trade in whale oil. But it also helped drive the leviathans to near extinction and prompted a reevaluation of the practice in nearly every country. The show also offers the true story behind Herman Melville's "Moby-Dick," and is a soulful look at why the novel endures.

You've got a friend

He may not be sweet baby James anymore and her tapestry is full of many more colors, but boomer icons James Taylor and Carole King are as appealing and their music as hummable as ever in their "Carole King, James Taylor: Live at the Troubadour" CD and DVD. …

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