Felipe Calderon Calls Arizona Immigration Law Racial Profiling

By Llana, Sara Miller | The Christian Science Monitor, May 2, 2010 | Go to article overview

Felipe Calderon Calls Arizona Immigration Law Racial Profiling


Llana, Sara Miller, The Christian Science Monitor


In a speech today to the US Congress, Mexican President Felipe Calderon said the new Arizona immigration law amounts to acceptance of racial profiling. He also called for an assault weapons ban.

In the first address to the US Congress by a foreign leader this year, Mexican President Felipe Calderon said reiterated his stance that the new Arizona immigration law amounts to a tacit acceptance of racial profiling.

"I strongly disagree with the recently adopted law in Arizona," he told American lawmakers. "It is a law that ... ignores a reality that cannot be erased by decree" and "introduces a terrible idea using racial profiling as a basis for law enforcement."

But the law - and any potential overhaul of the US immigration system - is not only being watched by Mexico but by Latin America as a whole.

IN PICTURES: US/Mexico State Dinner

In Colombia, where residents have long fled internal violence and sought better-paid jobs in the US, Colombians interviewed say they support Mexico's stance against Arizona and hope that it makes a difference in the immigration debate overall.

"Immigrants only do the work that Americans will not do," says Martin Botero, a pollster at the University of Antioquia in Medellin and has several family members in Connecticut, many of whom first arrived in the US illegally. "The law is unfair, and the federal law in general needs to be reformed."

Some US lawmakers reacted angrily to Calderon's address, which also called for the US Congress to restore a ban assault weapons and stop the flow of guns into Mexico.

Arizona's senior Republican senator, John McCain issued a statement saying it was "unfortunate and disappointing the president of Mexico chose to criticize the state of Arizona by weighing in on a U.S. domestic policy issue during a trip that was meant to reaffirm the unique relationship between our two countries."

Texas Republican Sen. John Cornyn, the Associated Press reported, said it was inappropriate for Calderon to lecture Americans on state and local law. He defended the Arizona immigration law. He also said, referring to the call to curb assault weapon exports, that "the Second Amendment is not a subject open for diplomatic negotiation, with Mexico or any other nation."

The Mexican leader said he was doing what he could to boost employment and economic growth at home, but pointed to the "need to fix a broken and inefficient [immigration] system ... the time has come to reduce the causes of migration and to turn this phenomenon into a legal, ordered and secure flow of workers and visitors."

Opposition in Latin America

Calderon's opposition to the Arizona immigration law resonates throughout Latin America - at least, among the elite. …

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