With Nikki Haley and Tim Scott, Will South Carolina Runoffs Make History?

By Feldmann, Linda | The Christian Science Monitor, June 22, 2010 | Go to article overview

With Nikki Haley and Tim Scott, Will South Carolina Runoffs Make History?


Feldmann, Linda, The Christian Science Monitor


Nikki Haley, an Indian-American woman, and Tim Scott, a black man, look positioned to win their respective races Tuesday in GOP runoffs in South Carolina. Their rise is a window into a changing state.

South Carolina is expected to make history Tuesday night, with an Indian-American woman, Nikki Haley, and a black man, Tim Scott, both apparently heading toward Republican nomination in their respective races.

Ms. Haley, a state legislator, was given little chance of winning the GOP nomination for governor just a few months ago, and soared into the lead after she was endorsed by Jenny Sanford, the ex-wife of Gov. Mark Sanford (R), and former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin - and also faced unsubstantiated accusations of marital infidelity, which appeared to backfire and build sympathy for her. She fell just shy of a majority against three male opponents in the primary two weeks ago and faces a head-to-head runoff Tuesday against Rep. Gresham Barrett.

Tim Scott, another state legislator, is also expected to win his runoff race for the GOP nomination in the First Congressional District against Paul Thurmond, a member of the Charleston City Council - and the youngest child of the late, legendary Sen. Strom Thurmond (R). That Senator Thurmond's son may well be defeated by a black man presents no small irony in a state with a heavily freighted racial history. The elder Thurmond ran for president in 1948 on the segregationist "Dixiecrat" ticket.

"Tim Scott is the bigger story," says David Woodard, a political scientist at Clemson University in Greenville, S.C., and a Republican strategist, noting that Mr. Scott's district is heavily white.

If elected in November, Scott would be Congress's first black Republican since Rep. J.C. Watts (R) of Oklahoma retired in 2003. Not only is Scott a Republican, he is backed by the conservative Club for Growth and some "tea party" groups.

Mr. Woodard says Scott's race is an asset in a year noteworthy for its conservative backlash against the Obama administration and the Bush years, which many conservatives have disavowed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

With Nikki Haley and Tim Scott, Will South Carolina Runoffs Make History?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.