Architects of Power

By Taube, Michael | The Christian Science Monitor, August 10, 2010 | Go to article overview

Architects of Power


Taube, Michael, The Christian Science Monitor


How Roosevelt and Eisenhower transformed the United States into a global superpower.

There have been 43 American citizens who have served as president.

For historians, academics, and pundits of all political stripes, this

select group of political leaders is an endless source of writing

material. Unfortunately, the interpretation, reinterpretation, and

occasional misinterpretation of presidential histories are growing

concerns. We're often learning today that some of what we read and

learned about America's political leaders in the past wasn't,

well, all that learned to begin with.

But hope springs eternal. Consider some recent evaluations of George

Washington (Richard Brookhiser's "Founding Father: Rediscovering

George Washington"), John Adams (David McCullough's "John

Adams"), Thomas Jefferson (Joseph J. Ellis's "American Sphinx:

The Character of Thomas Jefferson"), and Franklin Delano Roosevelt

(Conrad Black's "Franklin Delano Roosevelt: Champion of

Freedom"). To their credit, these authors have either shed new

light on their subject matter, or created a stunning reversal of

previously held assumptions about a particular president. That's

great news, as it helps us escape the ideological tsunami and

properly analyze commanders in chief according to ability and

leadership qualities.

The latest book to add to this impressive list is Philip Terzian's

Architects of Power: Roosevelt, Eisenhower, and the American Century.

Terzian is the literary editor of The Weekly Standard, and was a

finalist for a Pulitzer Prize in Commentary in 1991 while writing for

the Providence Journal-Bulletin. Terzian has produced a scintillating

analysis of two political polar opposites, FDR and Dwight D.

Eisenhower, and proved both men played critical roles in transforming

America into a global superpower. (Full disclosure: I know Terzian,

and he has edited my contributions to the Standard.)

On the surface, finding common ground between FDR and Eisenhower

would be a daunting task for any writer, even one as talented as

Terzian. FDR was "not a notably reflective man, and what

self-analysis he may have undertaken in his lifetime he kept to

himself." He was unique in that he was a Democrat "in a

predominantly Republican clan," and "was not a hero-worshipper by

instinct and tended to be jealous of contemporaries." Meanwhile,

Eisenhower was a military man who "did not come from a family with

a military tradition." He was a "superior student, with a

considerable competitive streak, and a voracious reader." And as

Terzian points out, "just as no one anticipated Franklin

Roosevelt's future in his youth, nobody would have recognized in

the young Dwight Eisenhower the historic figure he would become. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Architects of Power
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.