Poll: Americans' Grade for Obama Education Policy Is Slipping

By Paulson, Amanda | The Christian Science Monitor, August 25, 2010 | Go to article overview

Poll: Americans' Grade for Obama Education Policy Is Slipping


Paulson, Amanda, The Christian Science Monitor


Just 34 percent of Americans give the president an A or B, compared with 45 percent a year ago, a new survey on education says. But the poll also shows more nuanced views of education policy.

Americans' support for President Obama's education agenda is slipping, a new poll indicates.

Just 34 percent of Americans give the president a grade of A or B in his support of public schools, compared with 45 percent a year ago, according to the survey of public opinion on education, conducted by Phi Delta Kappa International (PDK) and Gallup. Support was down among Democrats and independents as well as Republicans.

But the survey, released Wednesday, also shows a more nuanced view of how the public views America's schools and education policy. Support is growing for ideas like charter schools and merit pay for teachers, which are being pushed by the administration. But support is slim for the sort of drastic school-turnaround strategies sometimes favored by Education Secretary Arne Duncan. When asked about the best way to deal with a poorly performing school in their community, more than half of respondents said that the school should remain open with the existing staff and get more support.

"If I were working at the [Education] Department, I would seriously rethink [the turnaround strategy]," says William Bushaw, executive director of PDK, referring to the department's support of plans in which the principal and much of the staff at a failing school is fired. "Americans just don't want Washington to get that far into their local affairs."

Controversial policies like merit pay, on the other hand, are getting considerably more support from the public, with 71 percent of Americans saying that teachers should be paid based on the quality of their work rather than on a standard scale. Almost 3 in 4 believe that teacher pay should be at least somewhat tied to student achievement.

"I think we all need to recognize that the current system by which we pay teachers is broken," Mr. Bushaw says.

The poll also revealed a growing consensus that teaching is what matters most in a school, as well as a broad respect for the profession.

By a wide margin, respondents said the most important national education priority is to improve the quality of teachers, ahead of developing better standards, turning around the lowest-performing schools, and creating better tests.

"That's right on track with the research that shows that the No. 1 thing that impacts student achievement is the quality of a student's teacher," says Jon Schnur, co-founder and CEO of New Leaders for New Schools, which is based in New York. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Poll: Americans' Grade for Obama Education Policy Is Slipping
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.