Christine O'Donnell and Sarah Palin: Top 5 Comedic Comparisons

By editor, Casey Bayer | The Christian Science Monitor, September 21, 2010 | Go to article overview

Christine O'Donnell and Sarah Palin: Top 5 Comedic Comparisons


editor, Casey Bayer, The Christian Science Monitor


What do Christine O'Donnell and Sarah Palin have in common? You mean, aside from the obvious? "Just give [O'Donnell] bangs and a pair of rimmed glasses and she'd be a dead ringer for..." Jon Stewart said on his show, flashing side by side photos of the two women after O'Donnell's victory in the Delaware Senate primaries last week.Political commentators can't resist the comparison, not just on where O'Donnell and Palin stand on the issues, but in other aspects as well, especially considering Sarah Palin's endorsement and mentoring of what many are calling her own "Mini-me."Why should comedians be any different?

What do Christine O'Donnell and Sarah Palin have in common?

You mean, aside from the obvious? "Just give [O'Donnell] bangs and a pair of rimmed glasses and she'd be a dead ringer for..." Jon Stewart said on his show, flashing side by side photos of the two women after O'Donnell's victory in the Delaware Senate primaries last week.

Political commentators can't resist the comparison, not just on where O'Donnell and Palin stand on the issues, but in other aspects as well, especially considering Sarah Palin's endorsement and mentoring of what many are calling her own "Mini-me."

Why should comedians be any different?

#5 A "trophy candidate"?

As comedian Jay Leno said on Monday night, Christine O'Donnell has all the qualities of a "trophy candidate." Leno noted that Sarah Palin should watch out because O'Donnell is "younger, hotter, and crazier!"

Remember when Sarah Palin burst on the scene as Sen. John McCain's running mate in August 2008?

Questions abounded as to why McCain picked the Mama Grizzly - was it race, sex, age, tenacity? The Washington Post surmised Palin was picked to help McCain "reinforce his maverick label?" And New York Sen. Chuck Schumer called Palin's vice presidential candidacy a "hail mary pass" in August 2008.

Is O'Donnell another 'hail mary pass" for Republicans in Delaware?

#4 Tina Fey back on SNL?

Who can forget comedian Tina Fey's iconic representation of Sarah Palin on Saturday Night Live?

It was one of the highlights of the 2008 presidential campaign and a role that earned Fey an Emmy for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series in 2009. Fey also parodied Palin's one-on-one interview with CBS news anchor Katie Couric and Palin's performance in the vice presidential debate against Joe Biden.

On Monday night, comedian David Letterman said on the Late Show that Christine O'Donnell looks an awful like Sarah Palin, "You know what that means, more work for Tina Fey! That'll be exciting."

Letterman isn't the only one making the Fey/Palin/O'Donnell comparison. Stick a pair of glasses on O'Donnell, and well, the result is rather uncanny. Check out The Examiner's gallery of Palin and O'Donnell side by side.

#3 The Tea Party connection

As part of the The Daily Show's "Indecision 2010" election coverage, host Jon Stewart noted after a clip about Christine O'Donnell's primary win in Delaware last week: "The Palin is strong in this one."

Right, are you, Yoda Jon.

Both Sarah Palin and Christine O'Donnell have strong ties to the Tea Party, or as Stephen Colbert called them after their recent victories in primaries last week, the "happiest angry they've ever been. …

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