Safety in the World's Food Supply

By Mehlenbacher, Evan | The Christian Science Monitor, October 26, 2010 | Go to article overview

Safety in the World's Food Supply


Mehlenbacher, Evan, The Christian Science Monitor


A Christian Science perspective.

Many shoppers wonder if the produce and dairy products they buy in the grocery store are safe. "How do I know this dried fruit from China is OK to eat, or this egg from the Midwest is uncontaminated?" they might ask.

With the economy rapidly globalizing, food produced in one part of the world soon appears on store shelves thousands of miles away, and little is known by the end-user about how the item was produced.

To improve food quality standards and ensure that hungry eaters far and wide buy a safe product, our conscientious prayers are needed. And they do make a difference.

God created the heaven and the earth, and it was all good, as stated in the first chapter of Genesis in the Bible. This relates to the food we grow today. When we are faced with reports of salmonella poisoning, hormonal additives, and pesticide buildup, the purity of the divine creation may sound like a fantasy. But the problems we face are not God-made. And they can be corrected through a greater love and understanding of what God originally designed for His creation.

God intends us to live safely, free from danger, harm, or threat of food poisoning. While the realization of this ideal doesn't happen magically or haphazardly, our prayers for integrity and purity in the food supply can include producers, distributors, and consumers alike. God is the divine Principle at work in the universe, upholding standards that we can rely on for safety in handling our food. Integrity, honesty, intelligence, wisdom, cleanliness, and wholesomeness contribute to the safe production and distribution of food. …

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