Afghanistan Peace Conference Urges Hamid Karzai to Talk with Taliban

By Gopal, Anand | The Christian Science Monitor, June 4, 2010 | Go to article overview

Afghanistan Peace Conference Urges Hamid Karzai to Talk with Taliban


Gopal, Anand, The Christian Science Monitor


Afghanistan peace conference concluded with tribal and provincial leaders recommending that President Hamid Karzai drop preconditions for talks with the Taliban. They also demanded that insurgents break ties with Al Qaeda.

Delegates concluded Afghanistan's national peace conference Friday by backing President Hamid Karzai's push to open negotiations with the Taliban in an attempt to end the fighting here.

But the nearly 1,500 tribal elders and provincial leaders present also told Mr. Karzai that they want him to drop preconditions for such talks and for an end to air strikes in civilian areas - both proposals likely to be rebuffed by the Afghan government and Washington.

Still, Karzai struck an optimistic note to end the three-day conference, or jirga, designed to give proposals to the government on how to end a war going on nine years.

"You have shown us the path," Karzai told attendants assembled in a tent. "We will follow that path step by step and, God willing, we will reach the end."

The jirga's principle outcome - a call of peace and negotiations - was widely expected as the government closely vetted the delegates and set the parameters of the debate. Moreover, the Afghan government is not bound by the proposals.

No preconditions for Taliban talks

Among the controversial propositions include the demand that both the Taliban and the Afghan government drop any preconditions for talks. Kabul and Washington have said that they will only talk to those insurgents who lay down their weapons and accept the Afghan constitution. The insurgents, on the other hand, believe such terms constitute a surrender and refuse to start talks until foreign troops leave.

A number of delegates said the government's demands were unrealistic.

"When they say put down your guns and accept our law and then we'll talk, what kind of negotiation is that?" asks a delegate from the eastern province of Nangarhar, who asked not to be named.

Some rights groups and civil society organizations worry that any changes to the structure of the state or the Constitution as a result of talks with the Taliban could harm important legislation that protects women, minorities, and civil rights. …

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