From Old Patterns to New Discoveries

By Moore, Elise | The Christian Science Monitor, January 28, 2011 | Go to article overview

From Old Patterns to New Discoveries


Moore, Elise, The Christian Science Monitor


A Christian Science perspective.

Recently, a new species of crayfish was discovered. Barbicambarus simmonsi is huge, about five inches long - almost twice as large as other crayfish found in the same region. And where was this monster crustacean located? Not in the Amazon or on some remote island. It was discovered under a rock in my home state of Tennessee.

Making discoveries isn't limited to exotic locations or special people. In a profound sense, every individual can make discoveries by opening their thought to new ideas.

Spiritually speaking, God is the creator of ideas and has created an infinite variety. These ideas already exist and await our discovery. And where does this take place? First and foremost, in our own consciousness.

We all have familiar patterns in our lives - routines, daily duties, schedules. We also might have familiar patterns of thought. We say the same thing when asked how we are. We react the same way when asked a question. We might even say the same prayers that we prayed yesterday and the day before. These patterns of thought and action work for us to some extent, or we wouldn't continue in their comfortable routine.

But in order to discover something new, we might need to be receptive to fresh approaches. This isn't rejecting the good already evident in our lives. It's acknowledging that good is progressive and looking for new expressions. Seeking inventive views is a hopeful approach to life. It involves expectation of good and willingness to look for it.

One example of the blessing of fresh approaches occurred while I was riding with a police officer as part of a ministerial program. A 911 call came - an armed burglar had been seen entering a house. My officer took off, racing through dark residential streets to reach the area. The dispatcher continued reporting through the crackling radio as the burglar exited the house. …

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