The Enduring Goodness of Japan

By Troseth, Lisa | The Christian Science Monitor, April 7, 2011 | Go to article overview

The Enduring Goodness of Japan


Troseth, Lisa, The Christian Science Monitor


A Christian Science perspective: Rebuilding in Japan with inspiration, resilience, and hope.

I'm not alone in sending waves of love to Japan as it takes courageous steps to recover and rebuild after massive devastation. Some of what I think about what restoration is and how it happens has been inspired by a talk I heard many years ago by author Maxine Hong Kingston.

She spoke not long after her house, belongings, and 146 pages of a manuscript she was working on had vanished in a fire, the same day she attended her father's funeral. It showed tremendous resilience for her to be there with us that day - a resilience that hadn't been consumed in the flames.

Ms. Kingston intimately described her thoughts the moment she realized she'd lost everything, and how, in the midst of this destruction, she began thinking about a cherished set of bells the fire had consumed.

Later, she said, new thoughts of how to reconstruct her book started to dawn and inspire her, ultimately leading to "The Fifth Book of Peace." She also mentioned that the first gift given to her after the fire was a set of bells - from a friend who didn't know this was an item Kingston had lost.

To me the bells and the book were symbols of the enduring nature of ideas. The qualities she truly loved about those bells, and the good work she had poured into the manuscript, couldn't be lost. All that good was right at hand to be rediscovered. This says to me that renewal happens in thought and blooms in action. Looking above and beyond what appears to be total loss, we can be assured that the all- benevolent Mind that conceives and perpetuates universal existence is revealing fresh views of ongoing goodness. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Enduring Goodness of Japan
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.