From 'Glory' to 'Gone with the Wind,' Fascination with Civil War Endures

By Goodale, Gloria | The Christian Science Monitor, April 12, 2011 | Go to article overview

From 'Glory' to 'Gone with the Wind,' Fascination with Civil War Endures


Goodale, Gloria, The Christian Science Monitor


The Civil War, which began 150 years ago Tuesday, has long been a potent theme in film - highlighted by the release of a new Civil War film by Robert Redford Friday.

From the earliest feature film - D.W. Griffith's "Birth of a Nation" - through "Gone with the Wind," "Glory," and even Ken Burns's groundbreaking documentary, the Civil War has been, and remains a potent theme in mainstream popular culture.

Filmmakers and novelists, poets and TV mini-series have tackled this most divisive time in US history as a means to explore both historical and modern notions of American identity. Indeed, as Tuesday marks the 150th anniversary of the war's first shots, Friday will see the release of the new Civil War film, "The Conspirator," directed by Robert Redford.

"The general public's perception of the American Civil War is significantly shaped by popular culture on the subject, largely because it is virtually the only exposure they have to the subject matter," writes Richard Goedkoop, a professor of communication at La Salle University, in an e-mail. "Gone with the Wind," along with other films, "are the Civil War," he says.

Mr. Goedkoop, who is also a licensed battlefield guide at the Gettysburg National Military Park, says he sees this when tourists come to the historic site.

"Those who have seen 'Gettysburg' come to the battlefield with a great deal of interest in the battle but very limited knowledge of what really happened," he says.

He points out that the film was based upon "The Killer Angels," a novel written by Michael Shaara in the 1970s, which won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Virtually no mass media depictions get the history just right, he says, adding, that even Mr. Burns's masterful PBS documentary, "Civil War," buys into many of Mr. Shaara's concepts.

Of course, mass culture does not have the same obligations of a history class, says Thomas Flagel, author of "The History Buff's Guide to the Civil War. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

From 'Glory' to 'Gone with the Wind,' Fascination with Civil War Endures
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.