Orange Prize for Fiction 2011 Shortlist

By Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 12, 2011 | Go to article overview

Orange Prize for Fiction 2011 Shortlist


Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Celebrating its 16th anniversary this year, the Orange Prize for Fiction honors "excellence, originality and accessibility in women's writing from throughout the world." Last year's winner was American author Barbara Kingsolver for her novel "The Lacuna." The 2011 award will be announced on June 8, 2011, and the winner will be one of these six novelists.

Celebrating its 16th anniversary this year, the Orange Prize for Fiction honors "excellence, originality and accessibility in women's writing from throughout the world." Last year's winner was American author Barbara Kingsolver for her novel "The Lacuna." The 2011 award will be announced on June 8, 2011, and the winner will be one of these six novelists.

#6 Emma Donoghue, for "Room"

The premise of "Room" by Irish novelist Emma Donoghue - a small boy and his mother are being kept captive in an 11' x 11' room - sounds horrifying. But Monitor reviewer Yvonne Zipp writes that "there's nothing lurid or prurient about this story of a young mom who is determined to create the best life she can for her son, no matter how horrifying her circumstances. (Think "Life is Beautiful," only less cloying.)" This novel was also shortlisted for last year's Booker Prize.

#5 Aminatta Forna, for "The Memory of Love"

"The Memory of Love" weaves together the stories of three men all struggling in the aftermath of civil war in contemporary Sierra Leone. Aminatta Forna, who was born in Scotland and raised in West Africa, has been called one of Africa's most promising writers. A New York Times reviewer wrote that "The Memory of Love" is a novel that "forces us to see past bland categorizations like 'postcolonial African literature,' showing that the world we inhabit reaches beyond borders and ripples out through generations."

#4 Emma Henderson, for "Grace Williams Says it Loud"

Grace Williams is sent to the Briar Mental Institute when she is 11. …

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