For US Muslims, Osama Bin Laden Death a 'Relief.' Next: 'Kill the Ideology.'

By Guarino, Mark | The Christian Science Monitor, May 2, 2011 | Go to article overview

For US Muslims, Osama Bin Laden Death a 'Relief.' Next: 'Kill the Ideology.'


Guarino, Mark, The Christian Science Monitor


American Muslims say they hope that the death of Osama bin Laden will 'lower the temperature' and end the association of Islam with terrorism.

American Muslims, like their non-Muslim peers, are welcoming the news that Osama bin Laden was killed Sunday. Many Muslims add that even though the death of the Al Qaeda leader is a positive step in fighting global terrorism, the greater challenge is ending the hateful dogma Mr. bin Laden represented - a dogma that many saw as a gross distortion of their faith.

Bin Laden's ideologies created "an albatross around the practitioners of Islam, including American Muslims," which is why his death prompts a collective "sigh of relief," says Madhi Bray, spokesperson for the Muslim American Society, a civil liberties organization based in Washington, DC.

"You have the kill to ideology that has supported Al Qaeda. That's going to be the great mission, to fight intolerance and the lack of sensitivity among people," Mr. Bray says.

American Muslims 'feel under attack'

Since 9/11, Muslims living in the US have faced bigotry on many levels, including having to justify their religious faith to non- believers. Many recount the days before Al Qaeda and bin Laden became household names, when Muslims could practice their faith quietly and mosques could open without protest.

But since the escalation of the war on terrorism, American Muslims continue to face what they say amounts to discrimination, ranging from a proposed ban on practicing sharia - currently moving through the Tennessee legislature and passed last year in Oklahoma - to what Ihsan Bagby, a professor of Islamic studies at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, describes as "hateful looks."

"Muslims in America feel under attack," says Professor Bagby, who hopes that bin Laden's death "will help lower the temperature and allow people to think more rationally and to understand that Muslims in general are unfairly being associated with terrorism."

In his speech late Sunday that announced bin Laden's death, President Obama paused to reiterate a point made repeatedly by President Bush in the wake of 9/11: "The United States is not, and never will be, at war with Islam." Mr. Obama called bin Laden "a mass murder of Muslims" and "not a Muslim leader," adding, "his demise should be welcomed by all who believe in peace and human dignity. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

For US Muslims, Osama Bin Laden Death a 'Relief.' Next: 'Kill the Ideology.'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.