Debt Ceiling Crisis: Another Day without Resolution as the Clock Ticks

By Knickerbocker, Brad | The Christian Science Monitor, July 17, 2011 | Go to article overview

Debt Ceiling Crisis: Another Day without Resolution as the Clock Ticks


Knickerbocker, Brad, The Christian Science Monitor


The political dance over the US debt ceiling crisis continued Sunday with the possibility that top lawmakers could be summoned to the White House, although no meeting had been scheduled.

The political dance over the US debt ceiling crisis and federal deficits continued Sunday with the possibility that top lawmakers could be summoned to the White House for more negotiating - although no meeting had been scheduled.

Positions were clarified (or at least reiterated) on the morning TV talk shows as the clock kept ticking toward the Treasury Department's August 2 deadline for raising the US debt limit in order to avoid Uncle Sam's not being able to pay some bills.

The run-up to that Perils-of-Pauline moment is unlikely to include two very large discussion points: The grand plan for tackling the nation's deficit and debt - a $4 trillion package over 10 years - once being seriously discussed by President Obama and House Speaker John Boehner. (Remember those halcyon days?) And the effort by some Republicans to leap-frog to a balanced budget amendment to the US Constitution. Not going to happen in the Democrat-controlled Senate.

National debt ceiling 101: Is a crisis looming?

Meanwhile, the political ground continues to shift as credit rating agencies, state governors, and independent voters weigh in on budgets, debt, and taxes.

Americans like lower taxes. No surprise there. Sixty percent cheered when Obama and congressional Republicans last year agreed to extend the Bush-era tax cuts, according to the Pew Research Center.

"But most also acknowledge that the best way to reduce the deficit is through a combination of cuts in major programs and tax increases," Pew reported recently. "And a large majority (66 percent) approves of raising taxes on incomes of $250,000 or more to reduce the debt."

So when Obama talks about "millionaires and billionaires doing their fair share," he seems to have most of the public with him.

But among all-important independent voters, the debt/deficit issue has become trickier for elected officials concerned about the political fallout of however they vote. …

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