Relief Ahead for States from No Child Left Behind Law, but with Strings

By Paulson, Amanda | The Christian Science Monitor, August 8, 2011 | Go to article overview

Relief Ahead for States from No Child Left Behind Law, but with Strings


Paulson, Amanda, The Christian Science Monitor


States can be excused from some certain requirements of No Child Left Behind, the US education reform law, the Obama administration said Monday. But it wants them to adopt different reforms.

States are likely to get relief from some of No Child Left Behind's most onerous requirements this fall, the Obama administration announced Monday.

Education Secretary Arne Duncan said that given Congress's failure to reauthorize the act - which expired more than three years ago - he will grant conditional waivers to states to free them from what many say are unrealistic requirements for student performance.

"We can't afford to have the law of the land have so many perverse incentives, or disincentives, to the kind of progress we want to see," said Secretary Duncan in a press briefing Monday. For states that are willing to align themselves with the Obama administration's priorities - including higher statewide academic standards and targeted plans to address the worst-performing schools - he said that "we want to give them a lot more flexibility."

Under No Child Left Behind (NCLB), states are supposed to be moving toward a goal of proficiency in reading and math by 2014, for the total student body. As more and more schools fail to meet their targets, states and districts find themselves under increasing sanctions and ever more restricted about how they spend federal money - leaving many states clamoring for relief.

In recent months, several states have already asked for waivers, while Montana, Idaho, and South Dakota have simply announced that they plan to ignore parts of the law.

Secretary Duncan, using figures that appear significantly inflated, told Congress back in March that unless the law is fixed some 80 percent of schools might be labeled as failing by this fall.

While agreement is widespread that the law needs fixing - and even that waivers from some requirements may be in order - Duncan has generated controversy by signaling that he plans to tie such waivers to other reforms. Details won't be announced for another month, but such reforms are likely to include higher standards, teacher evaluation systems, and better use of data, among other things - all areas the administration has consistently emphasized.

"It's a really novel interpretation of waiver authority - not simply requesting that states demonstrate they'll comply with the spirit of the law, or that states will find other ways to achieve NCLB's ends, but instead offering to let states evade federal law if they promise to do something else that Obama happens to like," says Frederick Hess, director of education policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute, articulating a frequent criticism of the proposal.

Conservative lawmakers have already bristled at what they see as federal overstepping and too much intrusion into local education authority, and have questioned the legality of Duncan's plan.

"I remain concerned that temporary measures instituted by the [Education] Department, such as conditional waivers, could undermine the committee's efforts to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.," said Rep. John Kline (R) of Minnesota, chairman of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, in a statement. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Relief Ahead for States from No Child Left Behind Law, but with Strings
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.