Rick Perry: Where Does He Stand on Health Care, Gay Marriage, and Taxes?

By DCDecoder, David Grant | The Christian Science Monitor, August 22, 2011 | Go to article overview

Rick Perry: Where Does He Stand on Health Care, Gay Marriage, and Taxes?


DCDecoder, David Grant, The Christian Science Monitor


Rick Perry is under a national media spotlight. DCDecoder looks at Rick Perry's position on three key issues.

Texas. Gov Rick Perry continues to go through the media wringer. He was GOP candidate Jon Huntsman's punching bag on the Sunday talk shows. Combing through all the national coverage Perry's been getting, here are three things you probably don't know about the GOP presidential primary's latest entrant.

1. Perry once fought for a government-mandated healthcare program with reasoning reminiscent of President Obama's on his healthcare law. In 2007, Perry pushed for mandatory vaccination of sixth-grade girls in Texas for the human papillomavirus (HPV), considered a leading cause of cervical cancer. The Weekly Standard's Andrew Ferguson writes that while Perry has since said he simply backed off when rebuked by the state legislature, that isn't the whole story:

After the legislature overruled him, Perry called a press conference and surrounded himself in front of the cameras with cancer survivors, women in wheelchairs, and victims of rape. Arguments about parental rights fell before the cold fact of how much money the state would save with the vaccinations: treatment for cancer, he pointed out, could cost $250,000, much of it borne by taxpayers, while a vaccine cost $350[226 128 139 ] - the same doctrine of "social costs" later used by President Obama and many others to justify mandatory health insurance and state-run health care.

Then Perry accused his opponents of moral depravity. He showed a video of a bedridden woman wreathed in medical tubes, lamenting the heartlessness of the legislators.

2. His views on homosexuality are complicated. Perry has recently said gay marriage is an issue to be decided by the states, that he is personally opposed to it, and that he supports a federal amendment to ban gay marriage. …

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Rick Perry: Where Does He Stand on Health Care, Gay Marriage, and Taxes?
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