Banned Books Week 2011: Top 10 Most Challenged Books of 2010

By Driscoll, Molly | The Christian Science Monitor, September 26, 2011 | Go to article overview

Banned Books Week 2011: Top 10 Most Challenged Books of 2010


Driscoll, Molly, The Christian Science Monitor


Each year during Banned Books Week, the American Library Association tells us which titles available in public US libraries and schools received the most complaints or challenges during the previous year. In 2010, it seems, it was modern bestsellers - rather than classics from earlier decades - that provoked the most heat. Banned Books Week 2011 is being observed from Sept. 24 - Oct. 1.

Each year during Banned Books Week, the American Library Association tells us which titles available in public US libraries and schools received the most complaints or challenges during the previous year. In 2010, it seems, it was modern bestsellers - rather than classics from earlier decades - that provoked the most heat. Banned Books Week 2011 is being observed from Sept. 24 - Oct. 1.

#10 "And Tango Makes Three" by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson

For the fifth year in a row, this true story of two male penguins in the Central Park Zoo who come together to raise a chick has topped the list of most challenged books. Charges made against "And Tango Makes Three" include "homosexuality, religious viewpoint and [unsuitability] to age group." The book is recommended for readers from preschool to grade 3.

#9 "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" by Sherman Alexie

Alexie's semi-autobiographical story of his struggles coming to terms with his own cultural identity is banned for "offensive language, racism, sex education, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group, and violence." The book is recommended for readers in grades 7 through 10.

#8 "Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley

Banned in Ireland when it first appeared in 1932, Aldous Huxley's dystopian story of a passive society continues to provoke controversy today. In 2010 the book was challenged on the grounds of "insensitivity, offensive language, racism, sexually explicit [material]."

#7 "Crank" by Ellen Hopkins

Hopkins' book "Crank" tells the story of a teenage crystal meth addict. …

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