Top 25 International Relations Master's Degree Programs

The Christian Science Monitor, October 2, 2011 | Go to article overview

Top 25 International Relations Master's Degree Programs


According to The College of William & mary's Teaching, Research, and International Policy (TRIP) project's most recent survey of international relations (IR) faculty:

According to The College of William & mary's Teaching, Research, and International Policy (TRIP) project's most recent survey of international relations (IR) faculty:

#5 The top five

1. Georgetown University Department of Government

(est. 1922; government.georgetown.edu).

Georgetown offers joint degrees in international relations and a master of science in foreign service through its Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service. It was the first to confer a degree in "international affairs."

2. Johns Hopkins University, The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies

(1943; www.sais-jhu.edu).

In addition to its Washington, D.C., campus, SAIS has locations in Bologna, Italy, and Nanjing, China.

3. Harvard University Kennedy School of Government

(1936; www.hks.harvard.edu).

The Kennedy School's John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum has hosted speaking events by figures such as Mikhail Gorbachev, Desmond Tutu, and George H.W. Bush over the years.

4. Tufts University Fletcher School

(1933; fletcher.tufts.edu).

The Fletcher School has admitted students from more than 70 countries.

5. Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs

(1946; sipa.columbia.edu).

Nearly half of its employed 2010 graduates are working in the private sector: consulting, banking, and business.

#4 Princeton - Oxford

6. Princeton University Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs

(1930; www.princeton.edu).

More than 85 percent of those earning advanced degrees here find jobs in public service each year.

7. London School of Economics Department of International Relations

(1927; www2.lse.ac.uk/internationalRelations).

One of the oldest and largest IR programs, LSE director Sir William Beveridge felt the school should "be equipped to deal with international affairs from all the three angles of law, history and administration."

8. George Washington University Elliot School of International Affairs

(1988; -elliott.gwu.edu).

More than 75 percent of its 2010 graduates found jobs after graduating, nearly half of them finding work in the public sector.

9. American University School of International Service

(1958; american.edu/sis).

The School of International Service was founded at the urging of President Dwight Eisenhower at the peak of the cold war.

10. University of Oxford Department of Politics and International Relations

(2000; www.politics.ox.ac.uk).

It's home to The Centre for Political Ideologies and the Oxford Centre for the Study of Inequality and Democracy, among others. The program stresses an interdisciplinary approach.

#3 University of Chicago - Stanford

11. University of Chicago Committee on International Relations

(1928; cir.uchicago.edu).

The Committee on International Relations is the oldest US program of its kind.

12. Yale University Jackson Institute for Global Affairs

(2009; jackson.yale.edu).

This is the newest IR program on the list. The Jackson Institute's first class began its studies in the fall of 2010. …

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Top 25 International Relations Master's Degree Programs
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