Penn State Football Needs a Time Out

By the Monitor's Board | The Christian Science Monitor, November 22, 2011 | Go to article overview

Penn State Football Needs a Time Out


the Monitor's Board, The Christian Science Monitor


The NCAA will 'examine' Penn State's loss of control over its sports program following the sex and coverup scandal. But the NCAA needs a robust solution to break the culture of sports dominance in colleges.

The NCAA has finally sent an official letter to Penn State - two weeks after news reports of the school's sex scandal and alleged coverup broke.

The letter only begins to hint at how much college sports in general needs a timeout from its dominance in many schools as a money machine and recruiting tool that distorts the moral purpose of higher education.

The National Collegiate Athletic Association says it will "examine" whether Pennsylvania State University lost "institutional control" over its total athletics program - and not just the Nittany Lions football team of dismissed coach Joe Paterno.

But what might the NCAA end up doing to deflate what its president, Mark Emmert, calls the "power of enthusiasm" toward college sports?

Should Penn State, for example, be banned from major-college football for a year to help the school gain needed perspective on the role of sports in academia?

Should it be barred from this season's bowl games?

And what would send a message to the school without hurting current athletics?

The NCAA has been on a reform kick in recent years following a surge of scandals in college sports. But nothing compares to the alleged cover-up by Penn State officials after they learned of allegations against former defense coach Jerry Sandusky for molesting eight boys.

Penn State has much to protect from scandal - its reputation, donor and alumni loyalty, and millions of dollars from sports broadcasts and the sale of souvenir merchandise. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Penn State Football Needs a Time Out
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.