Mitt Romney: An Ordinary ($21.6 Million a Year) American

By DCDecoder, David Grant | The Christian Science Monitor, January 24, 2012 | Go to article overview

Mitt Romney: An Ordinary ($21.6 Million a Year) American


DCDecoder, David Grant, The Christian Science Monitor


Mitt Romney is rich. Can American voters get beyond that fact? The Romney campaign is not doing the candidate any favors by trying to portray him as an ordinary American, says DCDecoder.

Remember Kim Jong Il Looking at Things? It's about that awkward looking at Mitt Romney gnoshing on a Subway sandwich, filling up his staffer's car with gas or dumping Tide into a coin-operated laundry.

Let's get something out of the way.

Mitt Romney is rich.

But not just "rich." He's not like the dad next door when you were a kid, the guy who owned the hardware store, made it to upper middle management at IBM or made partner at the law firm.

That guy drove a car that was a model and few years better than your parents. That family took vacations to another house they also happened to own and you were jealous that their kids always had cooler clothes.

We now know that Mitt Romney had $21.6 million in income in 2010. He gave $3 million to church and charities.

Mitt Romney is worth somewhere in the neighborhood of quarter of a billion dollars. Do you know what your worth is as a fraction of a billion? No, and neither does Decoder.

It's just different. And people get that, Decoder thinks.

Very few people in America really begrudge their fellow citizens for being rich. Sure, there are cranks who assume all the wealthy stole their way to the top but the vast majority of Americans don't see wealth in-and-of-itself as a bad thing.

Unfortunately, Mitt Romney/his campaign think Mitt needs to make sure he relates to "ordinary Americans" (our words, not his.) And that's why you get these cheesy, manufactured, down-homie clips of him banging around the laundromat.

As POLITICO wrote Monday morning, one of Romney's chief problems is simply that he

"tries too hard. …

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