Was It Right for Elizabeth Warren to Identify as a Minority? Will Voters Care?

By Trumbull, Mark | The Christian Science Monitor, May 2, 2012 | Go to article overview

Was It Right for Elizabeth Warren to Identify as a Minority? Will Voters Care?


Trumbull, Mark, The Christian Science Monitor


A genealogist is supporting Elizabeth Warren's claim of Cherokee ancestry. But what could linger with voters is whether it's right for someone who is 1/32 native American to claim minority status.

In the already intense US Senate race in Massachusetts, a new issue has emerged: Did Democratic hopeful Elizabeth Warren, who claims partial native American ancestry, improperly present herself as a minority to further her academic career?

Ms. Warren's campaign says her Republican rival, incumbent Sen. Scott Brown, is trying to create an issue where none exists.

On Monday, a Massachusetts genealogist entered the fray by citing a century-old document that, if correct, would show Warren to be 1/ 32 Cherokee in ancestry. That would confirm her statements that, as a youth, she heard relatives discuss ancestral links to Cherokee and Delaware Indians.

It would not necessarily close the matter as an issue in the Senate campaign, however.

Questions would remain, and potentially would resonate with voters, about whether it was appropriate for her to list herself as a minority when her connection to native American identity appears to be so small.

"You don't need to take a DNA test to know that in America, Elizabeth Warren is viewed and treated as a white woman, with all its benefits," commented Jamarhl Crawford, publisher of the Blackstonian, a news organization serving blacks in Boston.

Warren has said she could not recall ever listing native American background when applying for college or a job, the Boston Herald reported Saturday. The paper said Warren also commented that she didn't have a problem with Harvard Law School citing her background as part of its faculty diversity, but that she didn't know until recently that the school had counted her as a minority.

The Brown campaign has been seeking to define Warren as a liberal ideologue, with views more in sync with "Occupy Wall Street" than with mainstream voters. This issue could play into that narrative, if it appears that Warren sought to use a liberal orthodoxy (affirmative action) to promote her own career. …

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