Human Rights and Refugees: Women and Children First

By McNamara, Dennis | The Christian Science Monitor, March 25, 1998 | Go to article overview

Human Rights and Refugees: Women and Children First


McNamara, Dennis, The Christian Science Monitor


To mark the 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the UN Commission on Human Rights is meeting this month in Geneva to discuss how best to integrate human rights in all UN activities.

UN agencies, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and governments must work harder to protect the rights of some of the world's most vulnerable people: refugee women and children.

More than 80 percent of the world's 13.2 million refugees are women and children. They suffer double jeopardy: A denial of human rights made them refugees; but as refugees they are also frequently abused, simply because of their gender or age. When they cross a border to flee persecution or conflict, refugee women and children often lose the protection of established social support systems, such as schools, women's groups, and traditional family structures. The crisis in Rwanda, for example, separated thousands of minors from their relatives and their communities. Many remain in camps or centers, hoping to restart their lives. Refugee camps are usually Darwinian universes in which the strongest prevail. When agencies like the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) provide food rations or discuss the location of water wells in the camps, it's invariably a male leadership with whom we must negotiate, even though it is women who cook and collect water for their families. In recent years we and other agencies have made a point of including women in all aspects of decisionmaking in refugee camps, but many refugee women remain voiceless. We have ample and clear guidelines, within solid legal frameworks, for the protection of these women and children; but relief agencies, host governments, and we at UNHCR must do more on the ground to make those policies work. Sometimes, it's not for lack of trying. In 1993 armed groups of bandits were preying on the Dadaab camps in Kenya, looting dwellings and raping refugee women as they scoured the surrounding area for firewood. UNHCR and donor countries started a Women Victims of Violence project that included erecting live thorn-bush fences around the camps, stationing police nearby, and setting up a system to prosecute assailants. The incidence of rape decreased; but recent floods in the region rendered the thorn-bush fences useless and immobilized police patrols. During 1997 there were 88 reported rapes in the camps; 16 rapes were reported during just one nine-day period in January. The US is funding a firewood delivery project in Dadaab so women don't have to risk leaving camps. …

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