Arab Doubts about US Military Action Run Deep

By Cobban, Helena | The Christian Science Monitor, February 12, 1998 | Go to article overview

Arab Doubts about US Military Action Run Deep


Cobban, Helena, The Christian Science Monitor


This time around, the Middle East regional aspects of the Washington-Baghdad crisis are very different from the lineup at the time of Desert Storm. Dangerously so.

On the surface, much might seem the same, such as the pictures of Israeli citizens lining up for gas masks while American and British aircraft carriers steam into the Persian Gulf.

But in 1991, Washington went to war with the support of a strong, UN-based international coalition that included the major Arab states. Israel's leadership, back then, was warned to stay out of the fighting, even if that should involve - as it did - "absorbing" Iraqi missile strikes. The diminishment of Washington's international backing this time around is starkly evident. In 1990-91, Egypt lent its huge political weight and several thousand troops to Desert Storm. Saudi Arabia contributed troops, planes, airfields, and staging areas. Even Syria sent troops. This time, none of that is happening. Further, the Clinton administration seems to have given Israel's hard-line leadership a free hand to join the military fray in response to Iraqi missile hits. No one I've spoken to here - from presidential adviser Dr. Osama al-Baz to the common folk on the street - is convinced that there is any justification for Washington's military alert. In 1990-91, Iraq's invasion of Kuwait provided clear cause for counter-action. This time, even Egyptians sympathetic to Kuwait do not see Saddam's actions as justifying a military response. "He poses no threat to his neighbors," one Egyptian analyst said. "And over the years, UNSCOM has made substantial gains in identifying and destroying his unconventional arsenal. Why the big fuss now? The attempt to sort the present problems through diplomacy must be given time." Egyptian diplomat Ismat Abdel-Meguid, who heads the 22-nation Arab League, has been deeply involved with the diplomacy. On Monday, he returned here from Baghdad with a new offer from Saddam to enable UN inspectors to visit the 68 formerly closed sites. Meguid is working with France and Russia to craft a new Council resolution on the issue. …

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