Iraqis Already Pay the Price of One 'Weapon' While US Bombs May Soon Drop on Iraq, the Country Buckles under Years of Sanctions

By Scott Peterson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, February 2, 1998 | Go to article overview

Iraqis Already Pay the Price of One 'Weapon' While US Bombs May Soon Drop on Iraq, the Country Buckles under Years of Sanctions


Scott Peterson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


For many Iraqis, American bombs would be only one more "weapon" bringing tragedy to their lives.

In daily life for seven years, people here in Iraq have paid a very real human cost. Millions lack enough food and medicine. Death rates, especially for children, have risen dramatically.

The "weapon" causing all this is political: UN economic sanctions - or rather, as US officials say, the refusal of Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein to meet UN demands to eliminate weapons of mass destruction. "Sanctions are unbearable, inhuman," says Moyassar Hamdon Sulaiman, head of the Iraqi Red Crescent Society. "They {in the West} speak about 'weapons of mass destruction,' but we call this a 'weapon of mass suffering.'" The suffering of Iraqis, either from sanctions or possibly next week by American firepower, has become part of the diplomatic equation in the tense standoff over UN inspections of suspected weapons sites. Years of sanctions have caused widespread malnutrition and overburdened the health system, Western and Iraqi relief workers say. One-third of Iraqi children under 5 - 960,000 children - are chronically malnourished, the UN says. "Sanctions have turned Iraq into a ruin," says a senior UN official. "The impact has been horrendous." American officials say their top priority is to make the world safe from Saddam's weapons and sanctions, for now, are the best way. The sanctions were never designed to last so long - or to have such a negative human impact. United States-led allies victorious in the 1991 Gulf War believed that the backlash from Iraq's defeat would bring the downfall of Saddam within one or two years. Officially, sanctions are to be lifted when Iraq complies with UN Security Council resolutions to give up weapons of mass destruction. But American officials say Saddam lacks peaceful intentions and the sanctions may have to last as along as he's in power. Washington claims that sanctions are meant to harm the regime, not Iraqi civilians. But the result so far appears to have been exactly the opposite. Critics wonder aloud if the current American threat to launch airstrikes - ostensibly to force Iraq to open up sensitive "presidential sites" to UN inspectors - will again yield contrary results that will hurt Iraqis and strengthen their leaders. In apparent recognition that the UN is not the only one responsible for their plight, for example, hospitals seem to hang few portraits of Saddam Hussein that are ubiquitous everywhere else. Citing reasons of national sovereignty, Iraq agreed only in December 1996 to accept a UN-monitored "oil-for-food" program, which enabled Iraq to sell $2 billion of oil every six months and spend most on food and the health system. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Iraqis Already Pay the Price of One 'Weapon' While US Bombs May Soon Drop on Iraq, the Country Buckles under Years of Sanctions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.