A Treasury of Paramount Musical 'Shorts'

By David Sterritt, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, February 20, 1998 | Go to article overview

A Treasury of Paramount Musical 'Shorts'


David Sterritt, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Jazz is jumping on home video. Music fans, movie buffs, and anyone with a nostalgic streak will find much to enjoy in "Hollywood Rhythm," a new four-cassette series from Kino Video. It's devoted to the rich trove of musical shorts produced by Paramount Pictures in the late 1920s and early '30s, when sound was still a newcomer to the motion-picture scene.

Sound movies were born around 1925, when new technologies allowed theaters to begin showing music-filled shorts as preludes to their silent main attractions. These brief musicals remained popular during the early years of "talkies," and Paramount became a leader in this field. "Hollywood Rhythm" presents more than 30 of them, attesting to their range and variety as well as their entertainment value.

The first volume, "Radio Rhythms," spotlights the importance of radio as a breeding ground for audience-pleasing talent. Rising stars like Bing Crosby and Rudy Vallee make early screen appearances in items like "I Surrender Dear" and "Radio Rhythm," and cartoon superstar Betty Boop plays a part in "Musical Justice." The cassette called "Jazz Cocktails" features more of the African-American performers linked with jazz. Highlights include Fats Waller in "Ain't Misbehavin' " and Duke Ellington in a minidrama cued to his composition "Black and Tan Fantasy," directed by Dudley Murphy with striking visual imagination. White stars also appear, including a lively turn by Ginger Rogers in "Office Blues." Blues stay center stage in the third volume, "Blue Melodies," where Bessie Smith sings her heartfelt "St. Louis Blues" and George Dewey Washington does a musical meditation on "Ol' King Cotton." The last cassette, "Rhapsodies in Black and Blue," includes Cary Grant's screen debut in "Singapore Sue" and Eddie Cantor's over-the-top humor in "Insurance." Besides toe-tapping tunes, this series also offers a valuable lesson in American cultural history - including negative aspects, such as racist attitudes in Hollywood. …

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