Entertaining the Kids

By Jennifer Wolcott, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, February 2, 1998 | Go to article overview

Entertaining the Kids


Jennifer Wolcott, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


School vacation week is winding down. You and the children have baked enough heart-shaped, jelly-coated cookies for the next three Valentine's Days, watched the "101 Dalmatians" video at least that many times, and nearly broken the record for the longest Monopoly game ever.

Sound familiar? First of all, congratulations on keeping the kids well entertained. It's not easy to make the switch from school days to vacation days. Especially when your children's friends are off building sand castles on a tropical beach or shaking hands with you-know-who in Orlando, and they're miffed to be the only kids in the neighborhood who stayed home.

By now your well of ideas may have run dry. So how about using this section as a launching pad for fresh activities for the family. For example, if you haven't already, go see "Titanic," read about it here (Page B3), and then host a debate with one side arguing the movie's merits and the other its flaws. What about all those Oscar nominations? Did it deserve them? Why or why not? Is it a shoo-in for best picture? Or let Olympics coverage (Page B8) inspire your own winter Games at a nearby hill or skating rink. …

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