Unique Law Lets Florida Voters Make Changes to Constitution State Provision Mandates a Constitutional Review Every 20 Years. Key Issues in 1998: Gun Control, Equal Rights

By Warren Richey, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, May 8, 1998 | Go to article overview

Unique Law Lets Florida Voters Make Changes to Constitution State Provision Mandates a Constitutional Review Every 20 Years. Key Issues in 1998: Gun Control, Equal Rights


Warren Richey, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


A unique exercise in streamlined government is under way in Florida, where a special commission has just recommended 33 changes to the state's constitution - with many of the suggestions expected to ignite a firestorm of debate.

Some of the issues are common-sense housecleaning measures, like a proposal to ensure that only gender-neutral language is used in the state constitution. Others - like gun control and government reorganization - are so controversial that state legislators have avoided addressing them for years.

But now in 1998, Florida voters will have the opportunity to decide these issues for themselves. A provision of Florida's constitution mandates the appointment of a constitution revision commission every 20 years to take a fresh look at the state's No. 1 document and consider any changes. The 37-member commission examined hundreds of proposals during a series of hearings over the past year. Those proposals were narrowed down and packaged as nine different questions that will appear on the statewide ballot this November. While 15 other states also have mechanisms written into their constitutions to periodically ask voters whether a constitutional update should be considered, most have balked, turning down the prospect of electing constitutional conventions and voting on revisions. The Florida system is different. This is the only state in the country with an automatic review provision. Every 20 years a commission must be appointed, and it is up to the newly appointed commissioners to determine the scope of their work. "This idea of a regular look at the state constitution originates with Thomas Jefferson, who wanted to apply it to the Virginia state constitution, which he didn't think much of," says Robert Williams, a state constitutional law expert and law professor at Rutgers University in Camden, N.J. Jefferson believed "each generation ought to have a regular chance to look at the state constitution that governs it." No state has taken that philosophy to greater lengths than Florida, which ratified a new constitution in 1968, replacing one written in 1885. Need for change A quick glance at Florida's previous constitutions illustrates the importance of weeding out offensive constitutional concepts. Florida's first constitution, adopted 160 years ago, supported slavery and urged the Legislature to pass laws to prevent freed slaves "and other persons of color" from ever entering Florida. Bankers and "ministers of the gospel" were barred from running for the Legislature. And the constitution stated that only "free white men of this State shall have the right to keep and bear arms, for their common defense." Although few residents would disagree that the old constitutions needed to be revised, not everyone is happy with the prospect of an unelected commission proposing an unlimited number of constitutional amendments every 20 years. Critics of the revision process say it is too easy in Florida to change the constitution. Some say the job should be the exclusive work of the state Legislature because, as elected officials, they are accountable directly to voters. …

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Unique Law Lets Florida Voters Make Changes to Constitution State Provision Mandates a Constitutional Review Every 20 Years. Key Issues in 1998: Gun Control, Equal Rights
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