Mathematics Educators: Make Use of Technology

By Smith, Brian | The Christian Science Monitor, April 28, 1998 | Go to article overview

Mathematics Educators: Make Use of Technology


Smith, Brian, The Christian Science Monitor


At a recent mathematics conference I witnessed a computer algebra system do in minutes what, with pencil and paper, took me weeks in the 1960s. When as a young teacher I abandoned the slide-rule and square-root tables for hand-held calculators and simple programming languages, I could not have foreseen the wealth of technological aids available today.

I have incorporated technology into my classroom ever since I began teaching college classes in 1970. My fascination with technology as a medium for education has accompanied me through a 27-year career in the two-year college system, from which I recently retired, and continues in my current position teaching undergraduate mathematics and statistics.

Graphing calculators and computer algebra systems are - contrary to the assertions of a few backward thinkers - remarkable innovations. They put within our grasp, neophytes and old pros alike, the ability to solve our equations, and then to see those solutions come alive before our eyes. The capacity to visualize answers to complicated abstract and real-world problems, to graph slope fields for systems of differential equations, to immerse oneself in the twists and turns of three-dimensional surfaces and curves - these are no mere tricks of the trade. They are profound breakthroughs. Think of aviation without modern navigational techniques. No serious pilot would do without radar, and no one expects apprentice pilots to learn how to fly using only the tools that were available to the previous generation. The mathematics educator who refuses to teach the use of graphing calculators because they were not around when he or she went to school is like the pilot who refuses to exploit modern instrumentation because of a reluctance to rely on newfangled gadgets. …

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Mathematics Educators: Make Use of Technology
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