In School: Giving Arts an Audience Series: A Member of Ethos Percussion Group Shows an Instrument to Children at New York's P.S. 120. Arts Advocates Say Such Individual Programs Are Valuable, Especially When They're Part of a Systematic Arts Education. PHOTOS BY THOMAS DALLAL/SPECIAL TO THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR

By Marjorie Coeyman, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, July 28, 1998 | Go to article overview

In School: Giving Arts an Audience Series: A Member of Ethos Percussion Group Shows an Instrument to Children at New York's P.S. 120. Arts Advocates Say Such Individual Programs Are Valuable, Especially When They're Part of a Systematic Arts Education. PHOTOS BY THOMAS DALLAL/SPECIAL TO THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR


Marjorie Coeyman, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


A little girl with soft brown eyes and curly hair is in trouble at school. Her reading skills are poor, classmates tease her, and her parents can't help. The situation looks bleak - until someone gives her a clarinet. Practicing her instrument teaches her discipline and self-confidence, and soon she's auditioning brilliantly at the country's most prestigious music academy.

So goes the plot from "Beyond Silence," a German film recently released in the United States. The movie highlights a long-held truth in many European and Asian countries, and one now gaining strength in the US: Arts education reaches kids in ways that math, science, and language instruction cannot.

"Society is catching up to what many parents have known all along," says Richard Bell, national executive director of Young Audiences, a nonprofit, arts-in-education provider in New York. "Kids who are interested in the arts do better in school."

After years of struggling to survive budget cuts, arts education is now enjoying a renaissance. Politicians and educators are racing to swaddle infants in Mozart and lure at-risk kids to the opera. Yet for all the talk and wide-ranging experimentation now going on the question lingers: Have the arts today established a solid place in US schools?

Not yet, say many advocates, but widespread reform could be close at hand.

The 1970s, '80s, and early '90s were bleak times for arts education. Shrinking budgets, increasing curricular demands, and a focus on "basics" conspired to squeeze the arts out.

But today, fresh research about the beneficial effects of the arts on learning skills, new theories about how we learn, and dark assessments of how US schools lag behind their global counterparts have created a sense of urgency about teaching the arts. The arts are now credited with fostering creativity, curiosity, deeper spiritual and emotional dimensions. They also, proponents argue, develop team skills, problem-solving abilities, and spatial reasoning.

Yet, says John Mahlmann, executive director of the Music Educators National Conference, "there's still a real disconnect between talk and practice. Talk is cheap, and there's an awful lot of talk."

Certainly, arts advocates are encouraged by recent developments. Hiring of art and music teachers is on the rise. In K-12 public schools throughout the US, the ratio of students per music teacher has fallen to 469 to 1 from 523 to 1 in just the past five years, according to MENC. Arts and music are being restored in both Los Angeles and New York, after years of neglect. New York had jettisoned arts instruction after 1975, and Los Angeles had one specialty arts teacher per 4,700 students.

In addition, the inclusion of the arts in the federal Goals 2000: Educate America Act, and their incorporation into the national education standards as core subjects are being cheered as major gains. (The standards are voluntary, but many states use them as guides.)

But, say many involved in the schools, daunting challenges lie ahead:

Reaching agreement as to what "arts education" means. "We need to develop some kind of common vocabulary," says Stephanie Perrin, head of school at the private Walnut Hill School for the Arts in Natick, Mass. "Often arts education means using arts to teach other subjects, and there's a lot of research that shows that this enhances learning. …

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In School: Giving Arts an Audience Series: A Member of Ethos Percussion Group Shows an Instrument to Children at New York's P.S. 120. Arts Advocates Say Such Individual Programs Are Valuable, Especially When They're Part of a Systematic Arts Education. PHOTOS BY THOMAS DALLAL/SPECIAL TO THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
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