Rocky Mountain Backlash against the Religious Right Group of Religious 'Moderates' Steps into Political Fray with 'Code of Civility.' but Some Say Religion and Politics Don't Mix

By Jillian Lloyd, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, August 11, 1998 | Go to article overview

Rocky Mountain Backlash against the Religious Right Group of Religious 'Moderates' Steps into Political Fray with 'Code of Civility.' but Some Say Religion and Politics Don't Mix


Jillian Lloyd, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


When the Rev. Jerry Falwell founded the Moral Majority in 1979, it was the dawn of a new era in American politics: Conservative Christians staked their claim to power in the political arena and never looked back.

Now a new religious group is taking on right-wing Christianity, charging that the movement's political views have dominated for too long without a counterpoint from the religious community.

"For close to 20 years now, the religious right ... has pretty much been the group that has weighed in on political issues as they relate to religious life," says the Rev. Michael Carrier, chairman of the Interfaith Alliance of Colorado. "But {it} does not speak for all Christians, nor does it speak for all people of faith."

As the religious right plays an ever-larger role in shaping the political debate on issues ranging from school prayer to the right to die, a backlash against its conservative agenda is emerging. Here at the foot of the Rocky Mountains, the religious war is fueled by decades-old tensions between the state's conservative south and more- liberal north. But nationwide, the battle here - and the move by more and more people of faith to seek a new voice in politics - hints at a more fundamental change: Religious issues are increasingly becoming matters of public policy.

"What we're seeing is a politicization of American religion," says Carl Raschke, a religious studies professor at the University of Denver. "When you look at hot-button issues like abortion and gay rights, those are religiously charged."

The mingling of religion and politics is perhaps nowhere more fitting than in Colorado. In the southern half of the state, Colorado Springs is headquarters to nearly 80 Christian evangelical groups: Among them, Focus on the Family, which claims a mailing list of 2.4 million Americans. Meanwhile in Denver, liberals sport T-shirts proclaiming, "Focus on Your Own Family."

New to the fight

Into this setting, a group of self-described "moderate" Christians, Jews, and Muslims founded the Colorado chapter of the Interfaith Alliance one month ago.

The group's mission, says Mr. Carrier, pastor of Calvary Presbyterian Church in Denver, is to ensure a diversity of religious views in political debate. Its chief tool: a "code of civility," essentially promising that religion not be used as a weapon for political ends. (It recently asked primary election candidates in the state to sign the code; about 30 out of 55 candidates agreed.)

At the same time, the issue of whether mixing politics and religion is beneficial for either has received greater attention as groups like the Interfaith Alliance jump into the political fray. …

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Rocky Mountain Backlash against the Religious Right Group of Religious 'Moderates' Steps into Political Fray with 'Code of Civility.' but Some Say Religion and Politics Don't Mix
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