Ambrose Gets More Firepower from World War II History

By Henderson, Keith | The Christian Science Monitor, December 23, 1998 | Go to article overview

Ambrose Gets More Firepower from World War II History


Henderson, Keith, The Christian Science Monitor


THE VICTORS

By Stephen E. Ambrose

Simon & Schuster 396 pp., $28 Stephen Ambrose would be first to admit he's treading very familiar ground with this book. After nine other books on Eisenhower and/or the men who served under him, it's hard to avoid overlap. Anyone who read the most recent in this series, the bestselling "Citizen Soldiers," will recognize a number of repeated anecdotes and narratives. The remarkable thing about Ambrose's crisp, quick-march way of presenting history is that you really don't mind. Twice is hardly too many times to be told about the bravery of Lt. Waverly Wray, who singlehandedly thwarted a German counterattack in the wake of D- Day. Or how clever GIs finally learned to rip through Normandy's hedge rows. The reader gets much new material, as well - notably, added insights into the relationship between the top brass, personified by Eisenhower, and the front-line soldiers. The positive side of that relationship was a genuine regard for the average GI's courage and ability. The negative side of the relationship was the distance between men in the fox holes and those whose orders governed their lives. Ambrose sharply criticizes the tendency of US commanders to stay back from the front and thus fail to grasp the horrendous conditions faced by the troops. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ambrose Gets More Firepower from World War II History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.