Economic Crisis in Korea Pushes Many into Farming the End of Rapid Industrialization Leads to a Boom in New Farms. This Back-to-the-Land Movement Has Roots in Nation's Buddhism

By Michael Baker, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, October 5, 1998 | Go to article overview

Economic Crisis in Korea Pushes Many into Farming the End of Rapid Industrialization Leads to a Boom in New Farms. This Back-to-the-Land Movement Has Roots in Nation's Buddhism


Michael Baker, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Lee Noh Kee has escaped to what she calls her little heaven on earth. Amid lush hills and clear streams, her farmhouse overlooks a grazing cow, a pen of pigs, and fields of vegetables.

This rosy image of Korea - "the land of morning calm" - hardly fits with the industrial world that spills from South Korean cities. But as the "tiger" economy's crisis deepens, farming has emerged as an alternative for those disillusioned with industrial society and as an opportunity for legions of newly unemployed.

Farming is not always an easy life, but Mrs. Lee never much liked the modern world spun from conglomerates. As a school- teacher, she had hoped to inspire a more ecologically oriented future, but was slowly disillusioned. Although her escape to the farm was long coming, last winter's onset of the economic crisis prompted many others to head for the land this spring. Last year, just 1,823 families took up farming. In the first two- thirds of 1998, 4,914 have started new farms, according to the Ministry of Agriculture. Neither Lee or her husband had any farming experience when they came to North Chungchung Province nine months ago. They put their life savings into equipment. Learning to work the land has been tough, and Lee sometimes feels herself isolated with just her husband and five-year-old son. Severe flooding this summer made the transition doubly hard. But Lee has few regrets. "It's so peaceful and such a relief from complicated city life. It really feels like I'm living," she says thoughtfully. With no hired help and no ambitions to profit, Lee's goal is simple self-sufficiency. A loose network of neighbors who also abandoned the city helps. "Working to produce your own food, what you need, so you can take complete care of yourself has been the most gratifying thing. The goal is just being able to feed ourselves," says Lee in a telephone interview. Like others who got back to the land, she has little time for city visitors and keeps conversations short. …

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