America's Asian Markets Expand into Superstores

By Alex Salkever, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 8, 1998 | Go to article overview

America's Asian Markets Expand into Superstores


Alex Salkever, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Fidgety black catfish in oversized tanks greet supermarket customers at 99 Ranch Market, located in this industrial section of Hawaii.

Hiroshi Kobayashi, the supermarket's owner, unwraps a package filled with tiny slabs of mystery meat. "Duck tongue," he says, with obvious glee. "Bet you didn't know we had that."

Clearly, this is not your average supermarket. Yet 99 Ranch is one of several, booming Asian supermarket chains that are spreading across the United States, from Hawaii to Georgia, and on up to Canada. Borrowing a lesson from Western-style supermarket behemoths such as Costco, these Asian food chains have redesigned the traditional groceries of Chinatown into glossy superstores that target a predominantly suburban clientele. Behind the trend is the growing prosperity of many Asian- Americans, who have left their inner-city, ethnic neighborhoods for mainstream suburbs, and want a convenient outlet to buy their cultural foods. Once based predominantly in large Asian neighborhoods in California, these markets have become big business. Founded in 1984, Tawa Supermarkets, the California parent company of 99 Ranch, employs thousands and rakes in annual gross revenues in the hundreds of millions. The chains "have everything I want," says Angelina Summers, a Filipina pushing a shopping cart, loaded with two packets of pork snout and a wide-eyed toddler named Ashley. "Instead of going to Chinatown, this is so much more convenient," she adds. "And they have more - like the marinated meats. They usually only sell one style in Chinatown." The reception these stores receive often borders on pandemonium. When Mr. Kobayashi's store opened in March, it caused a one-hour traffic backup on a nearby freeway and upset government officials. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

America's Asian Markets Expand into Superstores
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.