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By Clayton Jones, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 8, 1998 | Go to article overview

Today's Story Line:


Clayton Jones, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


New tools of science are helping people find their roots across continents. In Siberia, Moscow Bureau Chief Judith Matloff found a scientist who may have located a people who are the most genetically like native Americans. That could put a new spin on the term "native". Quote of note: "If we have a mutual past, then we hope it will help promote cooperation with the Americans." - Orlan Cholbeney, head of the Tuva Republic mission in Moscow.

Get ready for the "e-purse." Europe hopes to spread the use of electronic money cards. The US is lagging.

Many Muslim nations are torn between Islam and a strong secular military - except Nigeria. Our story explains why. - Clayton Jones World Editor REPORTERS ON THE JOB * FLYING WITH ROYALTY: When our Africa writer Lara Santoro flew across Nigeria from the city of Kano (story, page 7), she received an unexpected upgrade. She had boarded a rather unpleasant and small aircraft run by Kabo Air and was waiting for takeoff when a flight attendant came tearing down the aisle, shooing everybody off the plane to a bigger, better aircraft. No explanation was given. But then she saw a commotion on the tarmac, with porters screaming, traffic controllers waving their arms, and police hollering. They were helping a small squat man approach the new plane. …

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