Letters

By Hank Stone, Moorad Alexanian, Ed Specht and Walter L. Stockman | The Christian Science Monitor, December 8, 1998 | Go to article overview

Letters


Hank Stone, Moorad Alexanian, Ed Specht and Walter L. Stockman, The Christian Science Monitor


The costs of preventing war

The article "Not just a world cop, US spends big to keep peace" (Dec. 2) seemed factually correct, but missed the big story.

The biggest of the "big" expenditures noted was $5.1 billion this year for Israel-Egypt peace. Let's put this into perspective. World military expenditures come to some $750 billion every year. The United States spends more than China, Russia, Iran, Iraq, North Korea, and Libya put together. The world has become too small and interconnected for nuclear and other genocidal weapons to make sense. The war system itself is obsolete. This is obvious to many countries, which look to a strengthened and more democratic United Nations to keep the peace, in a world free of weapons of mass destruction. To achieve a global system for keeping the peace will take spending tens of billions of dollars. But it will save hundreds of billions of dollars. Hank Stone Ionia, N.Y. Euthanasia and abortion: Be consistent Your article, "Sanctioned euthanasia: lessons from abroad" (Dec. 3) considers the ethical and legal issues surrounding Dr. Jack Kevorkian and his physician-assisted suicides. However, you fail to mention the connection with the issue of abortion and the 1.5 million abortions performed annually in our country. The moral and ethical issues of abortion were settled when abortions were legalized. If we can legally end the lives of the unborn, who have no choice on the matter, then it is obvious that we should legalize the death of those who choose it voluntarily. The question of a "slippery slope" occurring if such laws are enacted did not deter us from legalizing abortion. Let us be consistent. If you want to indeed make Dr. Kevorkian's actions illegal, then begin by making abortions illegal also. Moorad Alexanian Wilmington, N.C. Y2K and calm reasoning Thank you for your editorial: "Y2K Wake-Up Call" (Dec. 3). I've been tracking this situation for the past two years on the Internet. …

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