Plowed Under: A Tree No Longer Grows in Harlem New York Has Begun Selling off Some of Its Community Gardens in Whatthe Mayor Says Is an Effort to Meet Increased Housing Needs

By Harry Bruinius, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, March 12, 1999 | Go to article overview

Plowed Under: A Tree No Longer Grows in Harlem New York Has Begun Selling off Some of Its Community Gardens in Whatthe Mayor Says Is an Effort to Meet Increased Housing Needs


Harry Bruinius, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


As the bulldozer pulled up in front of Harlem's Public School 76, some of the children noticed the rumble.

"Mr. Goodridge, there's a bulldozer in the garden," one of the seven-year-olds told his teacher.

"A bulldozer?" When Tom Goodridge looked outside, he saw the bulldozer had crashed through the wood-framed wire fence, laying waste to the plant beds and trees he and his students had cultivated over the years. He dashed out the door. "Stop! What are you doing?" he asked the hard-hatted foreman. "This is city land!" the man retorted as he turned his back and resumed demolition. This scene from last November sent shivers through community gardeners in New York and other cities across the nation. For decades, many urban communities have cleaned up abandoned, garbage- filled lots and planted gardens - often with their cities' encouragement - in an effort to improve their neighborhoods. As the economy thrives, however, these city-owned lots are now prime targets for development. "Everyone is terrified by the New York situation," says Sally McCabe of the American Community Gardening Association in Philadelphia. "It's waking us up - making us realize we need to court our governments, make them realize what we're doing and why it's so important for our communities." So far, such tactics haven't worked in New York. "This is a free- market economy," said Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, responding to protests in January. "Welcome to the era after communism." So far, 44 gardens have been bulldozed, according to the New York City Gardening Association, a private, non-profit group. The city plans to auction 112 more in May, as part of an effort to sell some of its 11,000 vacant lots. It contends the land is needed to build affordable housing. But many community activists find it ironic that the work neighbors did to improve their communities and increase the value of the land is one reason the gardens are threatened. The Harlem school's garden - named the Garden of Love by the students and built in 1990 with help from the local Ethiopian Coptic Church - was one of approximately 700 gardens on city-owned lots. Like others, it received funds from the city's "Green Thumb" program, which provides permits, water, and fencing for communities to clear neighborhood eyesores. "It was just a dangerous, nasty spot full of construction debris and old refrigerators, tires - a crack house was behind it," says Goodridge. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Plowed Under: A Tree No Longer Grows in Harlem New York Has Begun Selling off Some of Its Community Gardens in Whatthe Mayor Says Is an Effort to Meet Increased Housing Needs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.