Discovery of Hidden Fall in Tibet Is a Watery Jewel

By Peter N. Spotts, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, January 14, 1999 | Go to article overview

Discovery of Hidden Fall in Tibet Is a Watery Jewel


Peter N. Spotts, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Plunging along the boundary between two colliding slabs of the earth's crust, one of Asia's mightiest river systems has yielded up the last of its hidden jewels - a waterfall that has tantalized Western explorers for much of this century. Written off by earlier expeditions as an object of religious myth, the waterfall on the Tsangpo River, which becomes the Brahmaputra once it crosses into India, is a toddler by global standards. It drops only 100 to 115 feet. The find, however, confirms the cataract's existence and closes a five-mile gap in the West's exploration of the world's deepest and perhaps most biologically diverse gorge. The gorge's discovery marks the end of a five-year quest for expedition leader and Buddhist scholar Ian Baker. He, colleague Hamid Sardar, and Ken Storm Jr. had undertaken an initial search in 1993, but came up short. Last year, after several more tries, Mr. Baker, Mr. Sardar, and Mr. Storm marshaled their efforts for another attempt. On Nov. 8, the trio and their guides found the falls. The discovery, announced last Friday by the National Geographic Society, which funded the trip, required team members to steep themselves in Tibetan lore. Over the centuries, says Storm, Tibetan monks had evolved sacred guidebooks that mentioned the falls, one of 70 cataracts along the river, each hosting its own deity. …

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